Looks Unfamiliar #10: Mark Griffiths – It Was Definitely An Audience Member, If You'll Pardon The Pun



Looks Unfamiliar 10 - Mark Griffiths

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever does. Joining Tim this time is writer Mark Griffiths, who shares his all too vivid recollections of Five Minutes by Mainframe, The Bloke Who Pulled His Pants Down On Kilroy, Disneyland by Frankie Goes To Hollywood, Charles Hawtrey as a vampire on Runaround, BBC Records And Tapes' Off Beat Sound Effects, and missing the first episode of a new series of Doctor Who because you were at the Doctor Who exhibition in Blackpool. Along the way we’ll be speculating on how Robert Kilroy-Silk's personal archives are organised, what 'Door Creak With Eno' might sound like, and how to respond to a Doctor Who-themed Sophie's Choice.


DOWNLOAD IT HERE - SUBSCRIBE IN ITUNES - RSS





Looks Unfamiliar is hosted by Podnose.




Support Looks Unfamiliar by buying one of Tim's books! Top Of The Box - The Story Behind Every BBC Records And Tapes Single is available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here. And there's several other books to choose from here...

Looks Unfamiliar #9: Martin Ruddock - I Made A Plasticine Harold Macmillan


Looks Unfamiliar 9 - Martin Ruddock

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever does. Joining Tim this time is writer Martin Ruddock, who tries to get a show of nostalgic hands for Children’s BBC Sherlock Holmes spinoff The Baker Street Boys, sci-fi/horror comic strip Doomlord, techno-powered toy range Robotix, Commodore Amiga game The Fairy Tale Adventure, dubbed German drama serial The Legend Of Tim Tyler, and Britpop band Thurman and their somewhat mysterious past. Along the way we’ll be finding out why history has failed to recognise the Baker Street Girls , why Slough’s playing fields are to be avoided at all costs, and why a song called ‘Evil’ might not quite have the intended effect on its target audience. Also, if anyone can solve our Tim Tyler-related mystery, please get in touch!

DOWNLOAD IT HERE - SUBSCRIBE IN ITUNES - RSS





Looks Unfamiliar is hosted by Podnose.



Support Looks Unfamiliar by buying one of Tim's books! The Camberwick Green Procrastination Society is available in paperback here, from the Kindle Store here, or as a full-colour eBook here. And there's several other books to choose from here...

"If This Were Really Happening, What Would You Think?"


Brass Eye finally made it to air, ‘with its satirical teeth slightly blunted but still intact’ as a jaw-droppingly brazen and self-absolving Channel 4 press release put it, early in 1997 and it was every bit as funny as it was exciting. It was a slap in the face for a media that wasn’t yet a third as bad as it has since become, and it also had silly jokes about Peregrine Worsthorne attracting wasps. Firmly convinced that there would never be any repeats or commercial releases, I fiercely guarded my off-air recording of the series and the surprisingly lacklustre original trailer; presumably they just hadn’t wanted to give away too much about the content. Shortly afterwards, it was joined by a longer edit of the last episode with the excised ‘Horrorcaust’ board game sketch intact, which somebody sent anonymously to the editorial address of the fanzine I was responsible for at the time. In fact, features on and references to Brass Eye were all over that fanzine. I was pretty much obsessed with it. At the time, I thought it was the funniest – and most important – thing that I had ever seen and maybe would ever see. Except…

...and if you like the sound of that, you can find my review of the Brass Eye documentary Oxide Ghosts here. Time to shatter a few myths indeed...




And if you want to find out what happened after Brass Eye, you'll be wanting Fun At One - The Story Of Comedy At BBC Radio 1, which is available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.